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I've noticed that there are a lot of Carnivals for sale with 2,000-15,000 miles on them. They are being sold as new with above-MSRP prices. But the question I have: How are they getting all these miles on them is they are "new"? Are they returns from unsatisfied customers? The link below is a multi-listing query service that shows:
Kia Carnival - AutoTempest.com
The Carnival is not a drop down option so you have to type it in the model field and that's how I get results.
 

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I only have suspicions for you, nothing conclusive. I suspect that the very reason they are above MSRP is part of the reason, people can make money off their original purchase. There was a low stock on the Carnival due to chip shortages, supply lines, and the initial recall. I had several people stop me and ask me to see our Carnival because they wanted one but couldn't find one. My dealer wanted to buy it back from us just a few months off the lot at above the price I paid for it. I have little doubt that price inflation in contributing to that price increase you're seeing as well.
 

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2022 Kia Carnival SX
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I only have suspicions for you, nothing conclusive. I suspect that the very reason they are above MSRP is part of the reason, people can make money off their original purchase. There was a low stock on the Carnival due to chip shortages, supply lines, and the initial recall. I had several people stop me and ask me to see our Carnival because they wanted one but couldn't find one. My dealer wanted to buy it back from us just a few months off the lot at above the price I paid for it. I have little doubt that price inflation in contributing to that price increase you're seeing as well.
Yup, I got offered $5k more than I paid for it when I took it in for an oil change.
 

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I've noticed that there are a lot of Carnivals for sale with 2,000-15,000 miles on them. They are being sold as new with above-MSRP prices. But the question I have: How are they getting all these miles on them is they are "new"?
Unfortunately, man has had a long-running history of his love affair with the road machine. And because of that, the clever corporate exploiters of man’s weaknesses have capitalized on that vulnerability by producing a wide variety of different forms and sizes of a beautiful seductress that appeals to the lusts of every road warrior, whether for utility or sport, and everything in between. They are masterful strategists at preying on the human weaknesses, and turning an equally generous profit in the process — whether feast or famine.

Now, because of the current impact of the CoVid fiasco producing chips shortages, fractured supply lines, and production hold-ups (as CoCo points out), the capitalists must resort to price manipulation and even gouging tactics to keep the cash-flow steady enough. So now they appeal to playing the supply-and-demand card to reap the benefits from a public lacking the wisdom to wait-out the drought, before indulging in their next love affair. So, what is the obvious and prudent answer?

Simple. Merely, recognize that your lust is fueled by superficial desire rather than absolute necessity, therefore, sit tight and weather-out the storm before acting on your unjustified whim to fill your perceived “lacking” with a seductive mistress — masterfully flaunting all her style, beauty, performance, function, and gratification-giving qualities. Right now, the prices are inflated by supply-demand, which is obvious regardless of the reasons. The cars are over-priced even before the pandemic hit, and we all have been indulging for years simply because most of us have the money it takes to get things we really don’t need as much as we fool ourselves into believing we really do need. Advertisers and marketing executives love this weakness in the human psyche, and certainly profit greatly from it.

If you are like me, you buy a new car or truck, and fawn over it with exaggerated care and attention — waxing it repeatedly, spraying the interior with a leather-scented mist, inadvertently removing the wax layers with repeated frequent washing, Armor-All interior cleanings, polishing the plastic trim, Rain-X window applications, detailing the motor, buying all kinds of accessories and trim amenities, etc, etc. That’s the infatuation stage, or the honeymoon just after purchasing.

Then six months or a year later, you hardly take time to even wash it weekly, or remove the bugs from grill, or clean the inside of the windshield. I see now that you’re smiling… so this must be true for you too. And what do we learn from this? The infatuation eventually wears off, sooner than we’re willing to admit. And we dropped over $40,000 on our new dream mistress. So, doesn’t this recognized irrational behavior justify the wisdom to just wait until the chips flood the market again, and the supply over-runs the demand once again? I could go on and on with my argument, but you get the point. The question hinges on how much wisdom we are willing to apply to this temporary dilemma? Who do you want to reap the benefit from this temporal situation, you or them? And how impatient are you really? Are you so impetuous, that you can’t even wait until she takes her cloth off? Don’t be a victim again, and again… and again. Wait for the buyer’s market. If you’re like me, the car I have runs fine, and another year’s wait won’t really matter much. Plus, there is an old adage: Don't buy the first year of a model change-over, until they work-out the inherent bugs and glitches in their new models.

Sorry for this long-winded dribble! When I read the OP's comments about over-charging prices, it touched a nerve and my verbal agility went wild. Sorry!
 

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We were fortunate to buy our new Carnival for $35,000 before the chip shortage took hold (and before all the positive reviews came in)!
I'm sure we could get more for it now, but we're not selling.
However it's worth noting that the dealer tried to add a $3500 "Dealer Premium" until I complained to the state motor vehicle dealer board.
A few minutes later I got an email from the district manager saying they would honor the original TrueCar offer:)
Caveat emptor!
 
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